Saturday, November 30, 2013

"Fortuna Major!"

Listening to my children read aloud the Harry Potter books is killing my love for that series. It's obvious that Harry Potter's appeal lies in the books' characters, plots and themes. It does not lie in Ms Rowling's talent as a writer. 

I muttered. 

I muttered crossly.

I muttered crossly while wondering if she got paid by the adverb and if people in England are extremely fond of muttering.

Below I've underlined a prime example of a sentence that tripped up my 9 year old emergent reader:



"Harry, Ron and Hermione joined the Gryffindors streaming up 
the marble staircase and, very tired now, along more corridors, up 
more and more stairs, to the hidden entrance to Gryffindor Tower."
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, p 74

Where was her editor? Did no one at Bloomsbury have the balls to say, "Fuck off with that 'very tired now' aside and stay on point. Don't use 'more' three times in a single sentence." 

Pass the butter beer. It's going to be a long couple of months. 

4 comments:

  1. Last spring we read the whole series out loud to our oldest and yes, it was a struggle - it's odd how you can gobble them up when reading in your head, but saying the words out loud makes everything clunky and cumbersome. I found reading with a british accent *really* helped - seriously!

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    1. The English accent does help, your right! Plus I have heard the audiobooks so often, I can hear Jim Dial's voice in my head when I get to certain passages.

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  2. It's galling how those mega-blockbuster gazillion-bucks-earning novels are often so poorly written, isn't it? But such is Life, eh?

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    1. It makes me wonder if JK Rowling is not the pleasant, easy-going lady I thought. B/c surely the only explanation is that her editors were too scared to say "have you ever heard about this new invention called 'punctuation?'" to her.

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